Replacing the Rear Brake Discs and Pads on a Volvo 940

Today, we are replacing the rear brake discs and pads on this classic 1992 Volvo 940 Estate. And we will also cover the replacement of the rear exhaust silencer and front lower ball joints.

Rear Brake Discs and Pads Replacement

We have a 1992 Volvo 940 in the workshop today, which requires rear brake discs and pads, a rear exhaust silencer, and lower suspension ball joints.

Revamping the rear braking system of a Volvo 940 is not just about safety; it’s a pivotal step in maintaining peak performance and ensuring smooth rides.

This article examines replacing the rear brake discs and pads, crucial components that directly influence your vehicle’s stopping power and stability.

Join us as we navigate the intricacies of a rear brake system refurbishment, seamlessly transitioning from worn-out parts to enhanced stopping capabilities.

Note: This is not a detailed description of how the repairs were performed. For clarity, we have condensed parts of the repair sequences.

Changing the Rear Brake Discs and Pads on a Volvo 940
Volvo 940 Rear Brake Discs and Pads Changed

A Little History of the Volvo 940

The Volvo 940, a quintessential representation of Swedish engineering prowess, emerged in 1990 as a successor to the highly acclaimed 740 series. Moreover, transitioning from its predecessor, the 940 embodied Volvo’s commitment to safety, reliability, and innovation.

Upon its debut, the 940 inherited its predecessor’s robust chassis and renowned safety features, setting a high standard for its segment. However, Volvo didn’t merely rest on past laurels; they introduced significant advancements to enhance performance and comfort.

Under the bonnet, the 940 boasted a range of engine options, including four-cylinder and six-cylinder variants, offering drivers both power and efficiency. Moreover, Volvo incorporated advanced suspension systems, which contributed to smoother rides and improved handling on various terrains.

Externally, the 940 exhibited subtle yet distinct design updates, refining its classic Volvo aesthetic while embracing modern sensibilities. Luxurious appointments and ergonomic design elements inside the cabin ensured a comfortable and enjoyable driving experience for passengers and drivers alike.

Over its production span, the Volvo 940 garnered acclaim for its exceptional durability and longevity, earning a reputation as a stalwart companion for families and enthusiasts. Moreover, its legacy resonates with automotive enthusiasts, showcasing Volvo’s commitment to safety, reliability, and innovation.

Changing the Rear Brake Discs and Pads

When contacting us to book a pre-MOT inspection, our client reported a grinding noise and poor performance from the rear brakes on his 1992 Volvo 940 Estate.

We inspected the car and found the rear brake pads were worn excessively, resulting in metal-to-metal contact.

Given these points, and after discussing them with the client, a parts list was drawn up, and an order was placed with one of our trusted parts suppliers.

Once the parts were delivered, we began stripping down the rear brakes, ready for the new items to be fitted, as detailed below.

Additionally, while carrying out the pre-MOT, we found the rear exhaust silencer to be holed and the front lower suspension ball joints excessively worn. We cover the replacement of the rear silencer and ball joints later in this article.

Removing the Old Rear Brake Discs and Pads

Click or tap the image to enlarge and view in full size!

We remove the wheel trims and nuts securing the road wheel to access the rear brake discs and pads.
We remove the wheel trims and nuts securing the road wheel to access the rear brake discs and pads.
Next, you can see us removing the rear road wheel, which allows us access to the rear brake disc and pads.
Next, you can see us removing the rear road wheel, which allows us access to the rear brake disc and pads.
Here, you can see the left-hand rear brake disc and caliper.
Here, you can see the left-hand rear brake disc and caliper.
Next, we start by driving out the pad retaining pins with a pin punch.
Next, we start by driving out the pad retaining pins with a pin punch.
Removing the retaining pins, we extract the old pads from the brake caliper.
Removing the retaining pins, we extract the old pads from the brake caliper.
In this image, you can see how badly worn the rear brake pads are.
In this image, you can see how badly worn the rear brake pads are.
This image shows that all the friction material on the pad is completely worn away.
This image shows that all the friction material on the pad is completely worn away.
Next, the brake caliper assembly is removed by removing the two securing bolts.
Next, the brake caliper assembly is removed by removing the two securing bolts.
In this image, you can see the mechanic removing the lower brake caliper securing bolt.
In this image, you can see the mechanic removing the lower brake caliper securing bolt.
The rear suspension arm acts as a convenient support for the brake caliper.
The rear suspension arm acts as a convenient support for the brake caliper.
Next, we removed the rear brake disc securing screw/wheel locating pin to allow us to remove the disc.
Next, we removed the rear brake disc securing screw/wheel locating pin to allow us to remove the disc.
Finally, we removed the rear brake disc from the hub.
Finally, we removed the rear brake disc from the hub.

Installing the New Rear Brake Discs and Pads

Now that the rear brake discs, pads, and calipers had been removed, we began preparing for the new parts. With this in mind, we cleaned and removed corrosion from the brake backing plate and hub assembly.

We then used copper grease to lubricate the handbrake shoe mechanisms and applied a coating to the hub face to prevent future issues with the brake disc.

Next was to install the new brake discs, pads and calipers, which is a reversal of the removal procedure. Another critical point to note is the application of copper grease to the rear of the brake pads and securing pins.

You can follow along with the replacement process in the images below.

Click or tap the image to enlarge and view in full size!

Compared to the new ones, the old rear brake disc, pads, retaining pins and clips.
Compared to the new ones, the old rear brake disc, pads, retaining pins and clips.
A close-up of the replacement rear brake disc, retaining pins, clips and shims.
A close-up of the replacement rear brake disc, retaining pins, clips and shims.
Next, we removed the loose and flaking rust from the brake back plates with a wire brush.
Next, we removed the loose and flaking rust from the brake back plates with a wire brush.
With the aid of a high-pressure air line, we blew off any remaining dust from the back plates.
With the aid of a high-pressure air line, we blew off any remaining dust from the back plates.
The hub face was also scrubbed with a wire brush to remove the worst of the corrosion buildup.
The hub face was also scrubbed with a wire brush to remove the worst of the corrosion buildup.
In this image, you can see the mechanic coat the rear brake shoe mechanism with copper grease to prevent sticking or seizing.
In this image, you can see the mechanic coat the rear brake shoe mechanism with copper grease to prevent sticking or seizing.
Next, we coat the face of the hub with copper grease.
Next, we coat the face of the hub with copper grease.
The new disc is installed, and the securing screw/pin is attached.
The new disc is installed, and the securing screw/pin is attached.
Then, we re-installed the rear brake caliper.
Then, we re-installed the rear brake caliper.
Here you see a better image of the disc and caliper after installation.
Here you see a better image of the disc and caliper after installation.
In this image, the mechanic applies a liberal coating of copper grease to the back of the new brake pad.
In this image, the mechanic applies a liberal coating of copper grease to the back of the new brake pad.
Next, the mechanic applied copper grease to the brake pad shims.
Next, the mechanic applied copper grease to the brake pad shims.
And in this image, you can see one of the pads installed in the caliper.
And in this image, you can see one of the pads installed in the caliper.
This was followed by the installation of the outer brake pad.
This was followed by the installation of the outer brake pad.
Then, the retaining pins were installed.
Then, the retaining pins were installed.
Next, the spring clips were fitted to complete the brake pad installation.
Next, the spring clips were fitted to complete the brake pad installation.
Finally, before the road wheel is attached, we apply a coating of copper grease to the disc hub surface.
Finally, before the road wheel is attached, we apply a coating of copper grease to the disc hub surface.

Replacing the Rear Exhaust Silencer

Next, we addressed another concern: our client had notified us of a noisy exhaust system. With this in mind and the vehicle on the ramp, we soon discovered that the rear exhaust silencer was severely corroded and holed. You can see the extent of the corrosion damage in the first image below.

With this in mind, we recommended a replacement rear silencer, including clamps, brackets, and rubber mountings. The parts were ordered after the client authorised us to proceed with the repairs.

Next, after the new parts had been delivered, we began replacing the exhaust rear silencer and fittings.

Click or tap the image to enlarge and view in full size!

As you can see in this image, the original exhaust rear silencer is showing some signs of wear and tear!
As you can see in this image, the original exhaust rear silencer is showing some signs of wear and tear!
Next, we offer up the new rear silencer after installing the new support band.
Next, we offer up the new rear silencer after installing the new support band.
Now, we adjust the position of the silencer within the securing band.
Now, we adjust the position of the silencer within the securing band.
Next, we begin tightening the securing bolt on the clamp band, but not fully, as this will allow some wiggle room for correct positioning later.
Next, we begin tightening the securing bolt on the clamp band, but not fully, as this will allow some wiggle room for correct positioning later.
Next, we fit the clamp, which attaches the rear silencer to the original exhaust system.
Next, we fit the clamp, which attaches the rear silencer to the original exhaust system.
Then, after checking the position of the rear silencer, we fully tighten the band clamp.
Then, after checking the position of the rear silencer, we fully tighten the band clamp.
Next, the silencer tailpipe section is fitted with the aid of a clamp.
Next, the silencer tailpipe section is fitted with the aid of a clamp.
Finally, we fully tightened the tailpipe clamp after checking its position from the car's rear.
Finally, we fully tightened the tailpipe clamp after checking its position from the car's rear.

Replacing the Front Lower Ball Joints

During the pre-MOT check, we discovered that the front lower ball joints were excessively worn and required replacement.

We gave our client an estimate for the work required, which he duly authorised, and two new lower ball joints were added to the order for the existing parts.

With the new parts received from our supplier, we began replacing the worn ball joints.

Click or tap the image to enlarge and view in full size!

After removing the front road wheels, we remove the lower ball joint securing nut.
After removing the front road wheels, we remove the lower ball joint securing nut.
Next, both the securing bolts, which attach the ball joint to the bottom of the shock absorber, were removed.
Next, both the securing bolts, which attach the ball joint to the bottom of the shock absorber, were removed.
Then, we released the ball joint from the suspension arm using a ball joint separator tool.
Then, we released the ball joint from the suspension arm using a ball joint separator tool.
Here, you can see the difference between the old and new ball joints.
Here, you can see the difference between the old and new ball joints.
Next is a simple case of reversing the removal procedure, first by attaching the two ball joint securing bolts to the bottom shock absorber.
Next is a simple case of reversing the removal procedure, first by attaching the two ball joint securing bolts to the bottom shock absorber.
Finally, the new ball joint is located in the suspension arm, and the nut is torqued to spec.
Finally, the new ball joint is located in the suspension arm, and the nut is torqued to spec.

MOT Test and Conclusion

After the rear brake discs and pads, rear exhaust silencer, and lower ball joints had been replaced and the pre-MOT checks carried out, it was time for the MOT proper. The car passed with flying colours.

In conclusion, this type of repair work is standard on cars over 30 years old. Therefore, it is always worth remembering that classic cars require periodic maintenance to keep them roadworthy.

Moreover, items such as suspension components, brakes, and the exhaust system are prone to wear and tear and will fail an MOT if worn excessively. Consequently, classic car owners should budget for these repairs, especially around MOT time.

Book Your Classic Car for Repairs

Have brake, exhaust or suspension issues with your classic car? Please reach out to us today to discuss your requirements.

Note: If you can not find our reply email in your normal inbox, it is worth checking your spam or junk mail folder. We also recommend anyone with a yahoo.co.uk or yahoo.com email account to provide a contact number.

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